SI Units Home

SI Units Explained
The International System of Units (SI units) is founded on seven base quantities. Each of the quantities, such as length and time, are assumed to be independent of each other. All seven units are shown here:
Amount Electric Current Luminosity Mass Temperature Time Length
Unit mole ampere metre candela kilogram kelvin second
Symbol mol A m cd kg K s
The SI or International System of Units (from the French Système international d'unités) as we know it today was developed in 1960 in order to establish an internationally agreed set of quantity measurement standards.  It has been adopted throughout the world for use in science and technology, and by most countries for day-to-day use. Exceptions to the latter include the US and, in some instances, the UK which uses a mixed system for everyday commerce.  To learn more about individual SI units click on the unit names in the table above or choose from the icons at the top of the page or the buttons on the right.
Derived units Individual SI units can be combined to form derived units, such as the watt, coulomb and joule. You can see a list of derived units here.
Unit conversions It’s often necessary or useful to convert one type of unit into another, such as kilometres into miles, kilograms into pounds or kelvin into Fahrenheit etc. You can do so automatically by clicking here.
Copyright  www.si-units-explained.info About & cookie policy mole (mol) mole (mol) ampere (A) ampere (A) metre (m) metre (m) candela (cd) candela (cd) kilogram (kg) kilogram (kg) kelvin (K) kelvin (K) second (s) second (s) Derived Units Unit Conversions Unit Conversions
Metric prefix units Most people these days know that kilo usually means 1000, so there are 1000 metres in a kilometre. Likewise, milli may be added to metre to form the word millimetre, i.e. one thousandth of a metre. You can see a complete list of metric prefixes here.
Conversions Conversions Derived Units Derived Units Metric Prefixes Metric Prefixes

SI Units Home

SI Units Explained
The International System of Units (SI units) is founded on seven base quantities. Each of the quantities, such as length and time, are assumed to be independent of each other. All seven units are shown here:
Amount Electric Current Luminosity Mass Temperature Time Length
Unit mole ampere metre candela kilogram kelvin second
Symbol mol A m cd kg K s
The SI or International System of Units (from the French Système international d'unités) as we know it today was developed in 1960 in order to establish an internationally agreed set of quantity measurement standards.  It has been adopted throughout the world for use in science and technology, and by most countries for day-to-day use. Exceptions to the latter include the US and, in some instances, the UK which uses a mixed system for everyday commerce.  To learn more about individual SI units click on the unit names in the table above or choose from the icons at the top of the page .
Unit conversions It’s often necessary or useful to convert one type of unit into another, such as kilometres into miles, kilograms into pounds or kelvin into Fahrenheit etc. You can do so automatically by clicking here.
Metric prefix units Most people these days know that kilo usually means 1000, so there are 1000 metres in a kilometre. Likewise, milli may be added to metre to form the word millimetre, i.e. one thousandth of a metre. You can see a complete list of metric prefixes here.
Derived units Individual SI units can be combined to form derived units, such as the watt, coulomb and joule. You can see a list of derived units here.
Copyright  www.si-units-explained.info About & cookie policy